Case history questions

I'm a second-year grad student getting ready to begin my first externship.  Could some of you share what your standard case history questions are to clients/parents?  

Those of you in the medical setting, what are the questions you always ask when you see a patient for the first time regardless of the referral issue?  Private practice?  School?  Long-term care?  Do your case history questions always depend on the individual client, or do you have a standard list that you use?
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One thing that is helpful to remember about the medical setting (either outpatient or inpatient) is that you are probably not going to be the first person who encounters this patient, so you may not be doing a super-involved interview. Your interview will vary depending on what additional information you need after you review whatever documentation you have for that patient.

In most cases, you will have evaluations and notes to read in the patient's chart. They're not always incredibly helpful, but they do give you something to go on. In an outpatient scenario, there will be an input questionnaire that every new patient fills out, which covers a lot of the basic questions and helps you to figure out what else you want to ask about. (You know that annoying paperwork about your medical history that they always make you do when you go to the doctor? Same concept.)
In the schools, you may or may not get to do a case history interview. In RTI, the teachers send home a standard case history form and various checklists to the parents. Then, we have an RTI meeting (after everything necessary has been gathered) and I have the opportunity to ask the parent more questions at that time. The questions on our case history form include:

1. History: developmental milestones, pregnancy, major surgeries/injuries, medications, family history of hearing loss, Autism, etc., history of speech/language/academic issues, etc.

2. Primary Concerns: What are they concerned about, when did they first notice the problem, have they noticed any changes, did their child's last teacher mention anything?

3. Have they ever received speech before? If yes, where, when, and for how long?

4. Language of the home

5. Major changes in the family: moving, death, birth, etc.

6. Checklists: Articulation, Language, Voice, Fluency. I have all parents fill out all forms.


When I meet with the RTI committee, my questions are more geared toward strengths and weaknesses - what the teacher and parent are seeing from the student. Can they follow directions, compare/contract, answer basic WH questions, etc. I also like to ask what they want to gain from a speech evaluation/speech therapy? What they want most for their child. What the see as their child's strengths and weaknesses.

I don't typically speak to my parents outside of an RTI meeting unless they contact me due to language barriers. If I have a question I need answered after I have consent, I have to use an interpreter, so I try and make sure I'm as thorough as possible when reviewing all of the case history information.