Speech and Language Pathology

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Teaching Spatial/Quantitative Concepts
peachyspeechie wrote in speechpathology
Looking for activities, ideas, resources, materials to teach Prek-K children spatial and quantitative concepts. (Hoping its something that is relatively inexpensive since I am purchasing out-of-pocket). Id rather purchase than go home and have to print, cut out, paste activities...too time consuming!

All input welcomed and appreciated

One of the easiest ways to teach spatial concepts (that I've found) is through object manipulation and through "following directions."

I have cups with animal faces (clear front and back) and balls that I use with some of my students. Other times, I'll have them "go under the table", "stand behind Johnny", or "put the pencil in the cup".

I haven't found a great way to teach quantitative concepts, yet. This website has some good ideas: http://www.thea4ideaplace.com/data-management/quantitative-concepts/quantitative-concepts-lesson-ideas

Otherwise, I use object manipulation as well. I also have similar objects in different sizes. I also tend to focus on teaching them in pairs and emphasizing that they are antonyms or synonyms depending on what I am teaching.

For spatial concepts I use whatever toys the kid is into: blocks, Legos, cars, dollhouses, etc. and ask them either to identify (Which one is in the house?) or place objects (Put the yellow block under the car). I also like to use a magnetic fishing game with a few boats and animals in the "water" and ask them to do things like fish the one in front of the crab and put it inside the boat. For front/back, I make animals "line up" to use a slide and talk about who is in the front and who is in the back.

I also haven't found a particularly great way of handling this goal. I use manipulatives like stuffed animals and different colored blocks. I've also had them do silly activities like putting things in their chair or on their head. Lining up is also a good time to talk about first, middle, and last.

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