Rainbow and Grandfather passage

Hello, I was wondering where I can find these passages transcribed?  I have been searching the web, but I can not find the passage in IPA.

Thank you!
Can't you transcribe them yourself? If you need a refresher just can search the IPA chart online and just do it quick. Good luck!
It shouldn't take you long to transcribe them yourself. Well, this is assuming you're not god-awful at transcription.

I've never seen any of them transcribed in to IPA, in books, or online.

This will help if you transcribe it on the computer http://ipa.typeit.org/
I am a sophomore in my first Phonetics class. I can transcribe it..... but I am not sure if it would be correct.
Fess Up
(Anonymous)
This smells like a homework assignment that you are trying to get someone else to do...
Re: Fess Up
(Anonymous)
That's what I think too... maybe you're not cut out for SLP if you can't handle the easiest of classes/homework assignments. I wish grad school work consisted of IPA transcriptions! Think about what you want from this major, this assignment seems silly but its part of the learning process.
Re: Fess Up
It is not a homework assignment. I was introduced to these passages through my intro course. I wanted to see it transcribed (correctly.....I am not that good yet). So, when someone is using this passage with a client, do they rely on something to check with the transcriptions... or do they just memorize the passage themselves?
Re: Fess Up
As I understand it, these passages as used mainly to listen for (hypo/hyper)nasality, to read as a vocal exercise task to determine if there is any vocal fatigue after a certain period of time, to assess the quality of the voice...etc, or maybe even to count the number of various stuttering behaviors in a standardized passage.

I don't really think it's used to assess if phonemes are present/absent within speech... which might be why it would be transcribed.
Re: Fess Up
Thank you for the info. I thought the passages were used because they contained all the consonants and vowels in speech..... I did not realize that the passages were used to spot nasality or vocal fatigue. My curiosity is fulfilled.
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From what I understand too these passages are to gather perceptual characteristics to help diagnose various motor speech disorders (dysarthria) .

Re: Fess Up
motor speech, yes, but voice as well. i worked in a voice lab and we used both for diagnostics, for both recorded analysis (rainbow) and endoscopic evals (grandfather)... i used to be able to recite both of them. the grandfather passage i would say a line at a time for a patient to repeat... i think i probably said it in my sleep for months. =)
Re: Fess Up
The passages ARE used because they contain all the consonants and vowels in speech. However, what you will find when you are listening to a client is you automatically listen for nasality, fluency, vocal fatigue, etc. They are not mutually exclusive.

However, that said - you typically don't see it transcribed. The client reads the passage, you note which words were in error and transcribe the individual words. You wouldn't transcribe the words they said correctly anyway - there's no sense in doing that. When the word is in error you transcribe it to help analyze where the error is.

Re: Fess Up
also, you may want to invest in the IPA Dictionary. It's a smaller book, but contains most of the english language (at least common words) with IPA. It's a great way to learn how to do it. It's also helpful if you find a friend you can pass notes/letters to periodically to practice. By the time you graduate, you'll have worked with enough clients to get better at transcription. You'll also find that many SLPs don't necessarily transcribe all 100% the same. People hear things slightly differently - as long as you're consistent you'll be okay (at least out in the real world).
Re: Fess Up
Thank you so much. I did not even think about transcribing only the words pronounced incorrectly (yes, I am still an undergraduate). Passing notes/letters in IPA sounds like a wonderful idea! I purchased the audio cd's that go along with my textbook for extra practice, but really locking in the information with common conversations sounds great! I will look into getting an IPA dictionary.

How often do you use diacritics and which ones do you use? I heard that diacritics is used mostly for research.....but at times it is used by an SLP.
Re: Fess Up
In all reality (well, mine anyway) - diacritic markings aren't used that often. The one's I tend to use are: fronting, dentalized, nasal, and nasal emissions. Of those four, fronting is the one I use the absolute most.


Re: Fess Up
(Anonymous)
Uh yeah, grad school is very busy but it's certainly not very hard so please don't act as if we're doing neurosurgery here.
Re: Fess Up
obviously this poster is either far smarter than the rest of us or going to a much different school - or not actually in grad school at all and hence the anonymous post.

Re: Fess Up
(Anonymous)
be nice to the kid..maybe it's her first speech class!
Senior Undergrad..
(Anonymous)
What a bunch of bitches!! So what if it was a homework assignment. She'd either learn the shit eventually or not and if she doesn't, she won't be able to make it through the rest of the program. Lay the fuck off and good luck girl.
(Anonymous)
I am a GRAD student and came online looking for the exact thing as I'm testing an adolescent tomorrow using this passage. I figured due to its popularity there would be a passage transcribed already. Relax guys really it's about helping eachother out.
(Anonymous)
I am a grad student, and I have some problems listening and transcribing what my client said. Phonetics class did not prepare me enough for transcribing real clients. I'm frustrated and worried. Any suggestions for improvement?